(Pic. of temple courtyard.)
THE XI SHI TEMPLE COURTYARD.

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Copy, in whole, or in part, without express permission of the author is illegal.

ZHUJI


* One of the
`Four Beautiful Ladies'
of Chinese Lore. *
by
LEE A. WOOD

XI SHI
(Pic. of statue.)
Xi Shi surrounded by water at a park near the train station

250 Km South of Shanghai, Zhuji is a small bustling city that is busy building new streets. Its present streets are alive with enclosed pedicabs, taxis, and busses. The sidewalks are filled with street vendors, including rows of shoeshine stands, mainly operated by females.

Zhuji is the home of the Xi Shi temple, named after one of the four beautiful ladies, and the stepping off stone to other attractions including Wuxie and the National park that contains the five waterfalls.

EXTERIOR

THE EXTERIOR OF THE SHANGHAI TRAIN STATION
INTERIOR

THE INTERIOR OF THE SHANGHAI TRAIN STATION
WAITING ROOM

DESPITE THE IMMENSITY OF THIS WAITING ROOM THE SHANGHAI TRAIN STATION IS SO LARGE IT HAS MORE THAN ONE
ALL ABOARD

`BOARD! PLANK. I KNOW, OLD JOKE

We arrived at the train station in Shanghai, one bus late, to catch the 11:30 train to Zhuji. It was just leaving as we were buying our tickets. As a tourist late isn't a problem and Shanghai has trains leaving continually.

As we were on a budget we opted for the 2:40 milk run rather than the 1:45 express. The Express, with air conditioned cars and passenger limitation, cost Y50. Fifty Yuan, at the time of this writing, '00/Dec. was worth $9.43 Canadian.

The milk run, which actually only made five stops, allowed you to open the windows, this was handy as the windows were too grimy to take pictures through, and had unlimited passenger capacity. In other words, after they sold all the seats at Y27 they sold Y22 tickets to anyone who wanted to stand in the aisle.

SHANGHAI STREET
(Pic. of street.)
Large department stores across from the train station.
Scooters and bicycles vie with pedestrians for space on the sidewalk.

Upon arrival in Shanghai I had purchased, for Y5, a street map in Chinese. While waiting for our train, wandering the streets, we came across a peddler selling maps of Shanghai, in English, for Y10. She claimed she had paid Y7 for it.

My friend, Chen Jun, who is a great bargainer, worked on the price until I got the map for Y7. I said to the lady, with a smile, "Shay shay." (Mandarin for thank you.) She replied, with a nasty snarl, "Shay shay."

I felt bad about the vendor not making any profit until later, when I was reading the map, I realized that she had obtained it from the Shanghai Municipal Tourism Commission for free.

BEAUTIFUL LADIES
(Pic. of Chen Jun.)
A beautiful young lady, Chen Jun, poses in front of
a `Beautiful Lady of China', on the platform of the Zhuji train depot

We arrived in Zhuji well after dark. The first taxis in line didn't want to take us as we weren't going very far and they wanted to wait for a larger fare. A taxi further down the line agree to give us a ride and we went to say hi to Chen Jun's parents who have an apartment not too far from the station.

If I could read Chinese I could tell you the address of the hotel I stayed in that night. I have it here, as a small map, on the back of the hotel's business card. On the front of the card, in English and Chinese, it says, `Please take me to the Jing Du Hotel'. If you should get lost in your wanderings you need only show this card to a cab driver.

The Jing Du Hotel is a two star, 6 floor, 90 room, edifice located in the heart of the commercial district of Zhuji. The rooms are clean and reasonably priced.

THE JING DU HOTEL IN ZHUJI

MAIN ENTRANCE

A 2 STAR HOTEL IN A BUSY COMMERCIAL DISTRICT
AMBIENCE

HOT WATER, (in the thermos) TEA, ASHTRAY AND MATCHES
MORNING VIEW

THE VIEW (from this room) IS AN ALLEY AND OTHER BUILDINGS
COMPETITION - WUZHOU HOTEL

ACROSS THE STREET, AT THE END OF THE ALLEY,
THE WUZHOU HOTEL,
WHERE I STAYED THE NEXT NIGHT.
PROBABLY NO STARS, BUT THE PRICE WAS RIGHT

I thought I was up early next morning but Chen Jun and Huang Yi Ming had already walked through town and up the hill to the West where they would have had a view for many miles in all directions but for the low lying cloud.

BEAUTIFUL
LADIES
(Pic. of Chen Jun & friends.)
Behind this park in Zhuji is the terminus for the busses.
In the park is a statue of the `Four Beautiful Ladies' of China.
In front of the park is the Rat Pack. (L - R) Rat, Chen Jun, Monkey, Shi Yun, Huang Yi Ming, Mouse, Xie Tian Ning.

Once everyone was awake we walked the short distance to the small park behind which all the busses congregate. Here we caught a small bus that took us to Wuxie where we spent the night.

WUXIE

Pinyin Chinese, that is Chinese that is spelled using the English alphabet, to be similar to the way it sounds in Chinese, can be very confusing. Pinyin is often based on Mandarin pronunciation but is just as often based on Cantonese or one of the many Chinese dialects.

The spelling is as confusing as the pronunciation. Wuxie, usually spelled Wuxie and pronounced Wooshay, is just as often spelled Wu Xie with the appropriate pronunciation of Woo Shay. Whichever way you spell it, it is important to pronounce it correctly so you don't confuse it with Wuxi, or Wu Xi, which is pronounced Whooshee or Who Shee, and is many miles to the North West.

Whether a seasoned traveller, someone who wishes to visit a rare spot of beauty, or someone who wishes a few moments of tranquility, the Wuxie scenic area, is a must see, regardless of how you spell it.

There are, in China, four scenic areas that are centered around the ancient lore of four beautiful ladies.

One such area is South of Shanghai in the North East corner of the province of Zhejiang.

The main city in this area is called Zhuji.

ZHUJI BUS TERMINAL (Pic. of busses.)
Busses to Wuxie can be caught near the park with the statue of the 4 Beautiful Ladies.

THE COUNTRYSIDE ALONG THE ROAD FROM CAO TA TO WUXIE

RAT

RAT (LEFT) HOLDS DISCUSSION WITH THE CONDUCTOR (RIGHT) ON THE BUS FROM CAO TA TO WUXIE
WINTER FIELDS

FIELDS ALONG THE ROAD FROM CAO TA TO WUXIE
WINTER FIELDS

FIELDS ALONG THE ROAD FROM CAO TA TO WUXIE.
IN THE FOREGROUND SOME STOOKS OF GRAIN
WINTER FIELDS

FIELDS ALONG THE ROAD FROM CAO TA TO WUXIE
WINTER FIELDS

FIELDS ALONG THE ROAD FROM CAO TA TO WUXIE
TERRACES

TERRACED HILLSIDE ALONG THE ROAD FROM CAO TA TO WUXIE

After taking the train from Shanghai to Zhuji we caught a bus, that we were told, would take us to Wuxie. However the bus stopped at Cao Ta and we had to take a smaller bus the rest of the way to Wuxie. There is a bus (#57) that goes direct from Zhuji to Wuxie but the first bus driver, not wanting to lose a fare, didn't tell us that.

THE DAM AND HOTEL AT WUXIE

DAM

SHI YUN CHECKS THE LOW RIVER LEVEL BELOW THE DAM
MAP

MAP OF THE AREA AROUND THE LAKE
STAIRS

STAIRS FROM THE HOTEL TO THE TOP OF THE DAM
HOTEL

HOTEL BELOW THE DAM

When we arrived at Wuxie, where we had planned to take a pleasant boat ride across a lovely lake, we discovered that there was no longer a lake. The dam was under construction and the lake was closed for repairs

Actually it was the dam that was being repaired and to be able to do this they had drained the lake.

BUS TERMINAL (Pic. of old building.)
High above the lake the bus company utilizes a farm yard.

As the boat that normally crossed the lake was high and dry we took another bus, backtracking for a short distance on the highway. Winding through a small village we crawled along a narrow winding road that took us up into the hills above the lake. At the edge of a forest we came to an old building which was being used as a temporary bus terminal.

THE TRAIL ACROSS THE LAKE

THE SOUTHERN HALF OF THE LAKE


THE TRAIL DOWN THE HILLSIDE IS VERY STEEP

AT THE BOTTOM OF THE HILL A ROUGH GRAVEL PATH IS THE FIRST PART OF THE TRAIL

A BAMBOO BRIDGE CROSSES A STREAM WHERE ONCE A BOAT CROSSED A LAKE

IN THE NORTHERN HALF OF THE LAKE A GOOD TRAIL HAS BEEN BUILT ALONG THE BASE OF THE MOUNTAIN

ALMOST THERE. THE RAT PAK THINKS IT WILL TAKE FOREVER
LAKE HEAD

AT THE HEAD OF THE LAKE, A SMALL DAM CONTROLS THE STREAM

From the bus stop we walked along a trail through the forest, to a small hut where the trail began to zig zag down the steep side of the hill to the bottom of what had been the lake.

As we walked down the cliff we got glimpses, through the trees, of the empty lake bed, stretching away in both directions. At the bottom of the lake we found that a new trail had been built along the side of the mountain, above the mud in the lake bed. It was a long but pleasant walk to the head of the lake where we climbed up a wide set of stairs to a paved road.

The road meandered along the side of the mountain, past a pick up point where we could have boarded a small passenger vehicle, through groves of bamboo and garden like orchards to the first of the hotels.

* 80 rooms
* Conference
room for 200
* Gym
* Dinning room
for 500.
* Rec. room.
* Sauna.

(graphic image of hotel. )
TWO DRAGON INN

At the Two Dragon Inn we negotiated a price for our room which was less than half the summer rate. We got this lower rate because it was off season and because there was no electricity. The electricity came on shortly after we returned to our rooms that evening and went off the next morning shortly after daybreak. I believe that we were the only guests in the hotel and until we arrived the staff were not fortunate enough to have electricity at night.

As it was getting late in the day by the time we had finished checking in I came outside to explore as much as possible before dark. On the stairs at the front of the hotel, overlooking the lovely gardens, I met Xu Ye and Hu Jun Ping, two young ladies from Zhuji, who had come to Wuxie seeking employment.

Having stayed at the hotel for some twenty days, hoping to get a job working on computers Hu Gun Ping, had just been told that she would start work the next as a waitress. I suspect that was because we had just booked in. As it turned out we never ate any meals there so I don't know if Hu Gun Ping actually worked.

Hu Gun Ping had studied English in school some four years ago and I was the first person she had met that speaks English. Her English was fairly good as she remembered quit a bit from her high school days.

The three of us explored some trails and she pointed out to me that the rocks of the path leading up to the waterfall had been laid some three thousand years ago.

While traversing a trail Hu Jun Ping slipped and twisted her knee so Xu Ye and I helped her back to the hotel. As it was near dark and I hadn't had supper yet I went looking for the Rat Pak, my friends from Shanghai.

Near the front of the temple I heard laughter from the other side of the creek about the time Shi Yun spotted me through the trees. I walked across the stream on stepping blocks that were centuries old while Yi Ming went into the kitchen to order more food.

By now all was pitch black and we were eating by the periodic light of a Bic lighter until the cook brought out a Coleman lantern.

After an excellent meal of noodles we crossed the creek, by feel, and found a small store that was still open where we were able to buy candles.

Back in the hotel, as we were getting a candle set in a coffee cup, the electricity came on.

The next morning, at 7:30 AM, as I was reading in bed, the electricity went off.

HOTELS AT THE LAKE

TWO DRAGON INN

RESTFUL GARDENS BENEATH THE EARLY MORNING CLOUD
SHI YUN

MONKEY TAKES AN EARLY MORNING STROLL
THROUGH THE GROUNDS OF THE 2 DRAGON INN
HU JUN PING

JUN (LEFT) AND FELLOW EMPLOYEES PREPARE BREAKFAST
IN THE KITCHEN OF THE 2 DRAGON INN

A HOTEL CLOSE TO THE TEMPLE

Monkey and I walked up to the Temple and had breakfast at the restaurant inside, then took breakfast back to the hotel for the rest of the Rat Pak who were still abed.

THE WUXIE BUDDHIST TEMPLE

COURTYARD

ENTRANCE TO THE RESTAURANT IN THE TEMPLE COURTYARD

RESTAURANT IN THE TEMPLE
MONK

TOO LATE. A MONK TELLS ME NOT TO
TAKE PICTURES OF THE BUDDHA

Though the ever present clouds hid the tops of the mountains and threatened rain the day was much like the day before. January weather is cool and cloudy.

SCENES AROUND THE TEMPLE

TRAIL

ONE OF THE MANY TRAILS THROUGH THE
GROUNDS OF THE TWO DRAGON MOUNTAIN VILLAGE

A MAP OF THE AREA AROUND THE TEMPLE
HU JUN PING

HU JUN PING (BLACK JACKET) AND XU YE POSE
FOR ME IN A STREAM BED
HU JUN PING

HU JUN PING AND XU YE (WHITE JACKET) CLIMB STAIRS
THAT WERE HAND MADE FROM STONE OVER 3,000 YEARS AGO
TRAIL

THE TRAIL WINDS THROUGH A NARROW CANYON
THE STONES OF THE TRAIL WERE LAID SOME 3,000 YEARS AGO
TRAIL

THOUGH MID WINTER, MANY TREES ARE STILL IN LEAF
STONE BRIDGE

BRIDGE OF STONE THAT LOOKS LIKE STONES
MANY OF THE BRIDGES ARE CARVED TO RESEMBLE LOGS
RAT PAK

THE TRAIL CROSSES STREAMS AS IT CLIMBS HIGH INTO THE MOUNTAINS
THE RAT PAK OVERTURN ROCKS AND FIND A SMALL CRAB
RAT PAK

THE RAT PAK EXPLORE A QUIET POOL
N A PLEASANT STREAM
STONE TABLE

REST AREA ALONG THE TRAIL, ONE OF TWO,
WITH TABLE AND STOOLS MADE OF STONE
WATERFALL

A LOVELY AREA TO REST ALONG THE TRAIL
PLACID POOL

THE RAT PAK. MOUSE [(XIE TIAN NING)(LEFT)]
RAT (CHEN JUN), MONKEY [(SHI YUN)(RIGHT)]
RESTAURANT

FAR UP THE CANYON THIS FARMERÔł×S
COTTAGE DOUBLES AS A RESTAURANT
BAMBOO FOREST

A MAZE OF TRAILS WITHIN A BAMBOO FOREST

The Rat Pak and I followed the trail that I had started on with Hu Gun Ping the night before but continued past the falls, way past. The trail winds around the base of the mountain. According to the sign it continues around the mountain and comes back to the temple but we came to a dead end and had to back track. It looked like the path had been washed out by spring rains.

The trail is windy and hilly with many beautiful locations to sit and have a picnic. There is also a small restaurant near the far end. Just before the restaurant there is a steep set of stairs that disappear into the clouds. At the top of the mountain there is a hotel.

Every so often you will see a tree stump with a hole in the side. These are made of concrete and are trash receptacles.

The area is called Dong Yuan or West Landscape.

Near the temple is another hotel. Between the hotel and the temple is a gentle stream with a lovely park like setting. I could picture myself, in warmer weather, sitting on the bank of the stream, with my notebook, composing, while I enjoyed the tranquility of the area. It is easy to understand why the monks of old chose this place to build a temple while they strived to become Buddhas.

FIFTH CASCADE (Pic. of waterfall.)
THE `FIFTH CASCADE' IS THE LOWEST OF THE `FIVE WATERFALLS AND THE CLOSEST TO THE TEMPLE

Just past the temple is a lovely waterfall called the Fifth Cascade. Beside the falls the trail climbs into the mountain to more waterfalls.

After a lunch at one of the restaurants beside the temple we started back to Wuxie. After following the main road for a ways we detoured along smaller trails through a bamboo park which eventually took us back to the main trail.

DRY LAKE (Pic. of lake bed.)
IT WAS SHORTER TO WALK THE MIDDLE OF THE LAKE

When we reached the lake, rather than use the winding trail on the side of the mountain, we followed a well worn path through the mud in the bottom of the lake. Employees of the hotels who make the trek daily try to shorten the distance by going directly along the center of the lake.

REST STOP (Pic. of little shack on hill.)
THE RAT PAK STOPS TO TAKE A PICTURE OF THE OLD MAN (ME), WHEEZING UP THE HILL

Climbing back up the hill was tiring and someone knew it would be. Behind the little hut, where we had begun our descent is a small table and some seats. here, an enterprising gentleman had set up shop, selling water and other refreshments.

COTTON FIELD (Pic. of field.)
A FIELD SITS IDLE DURING THE WINTER MONTHS BUT THERE WERE STILL SOME COTTON BOLLS LEFT

At the top of the hill while waiting for the bus we explored a cotton field that still had a few unpicked bolls from last years crop.

The bus that took us down the hill took us back to the starting point at the damn and then after a short wait took us directly back to Wuxie.

For those who like walking, tranquility, beautiful scenery, and history the temple at Wuxie Lake is a must see.

We returned to Zhuji late on Saturday night to find that there were no seats for sale on the train. As we didn't wish to stand all the way to Shanghai, and we were getting low on funds, we found a hotel that was lower priced than the Jing Du and actually a block closer to the train station.

Sunday morning I strolled the city of Zhuji where I saw one of the largest markets I have ever encountered. The main floor is a hubbub of many little stalls selling, literally, everything from soup to nuts. The second floor is mostly clothing, and a smaller third floor is mostly furniture.

A large portion of the main floor is businesses that concentrate on items made with pearls. Zhuji is a major producer of cultured pearls.


STREETS OF ZHUJI

GENTA RD.

LOOKING NORTH ON GENTA RD.
THE JING DU HOTEL IS ON THE RIGHT
GENTA RD.

LOOKING SOUTH ON GENTA RD.
GENTA ROAD OVERPASS

LIKE IN SHANGHAI,
THE PEDESTRIAN OVERPASS ENCIRCLES THE INTERSECTION
ZHUJI

LOOKING EAST FROM GENTA RD.
POLICE

THE TWO WHITE VANS ARE POLICE VEHICLES
THE OFFICERS UNDER THE STAIRS WERE STOPPING TRAFFIC, LOOKING FOR SOMETHING
CONSTRUCTION

NOTE THE WALKING TRACTOR CONVERTED TO A SMALL DUMPER FOR HAULING CONCRETE
EVERYWHERE I LOOKED IN ZHUJI THERE WERE STREETS BEING BUILT OR REPAIRED

As well I strolled through the park along the river and across a bridge to a more upscale part of town where another park follows the other side of the river.

Like Shanghai, everything in Zhuji is dusty and grimy. Buildings in China, like those in Mexico, are not designed for heating in winter but for cooling in summer with air conditioning, fans, and tile walls and floors. The thin paint on the concrete walls allows the moisture to show through. This along with low energy fluorescent lights makes rooms look dull and lifeless.

After lunch we caught the #2 bus which didn't take us all the way to the Xi Shi temple but close enough to walk the rest of the way. Actually, if we had known, the temple was within walking distance of the hotel, not far from the park I had walked through earlier. Also, if we had know, the #12 bus would have taken us right to the temple. When we returned from the temple we took a taxi for the price of Y7.

The Xi Shi temple is named after Xi Shi, one of the four beautiful ladies of Chinese Lore.

Xi Shi, who's father was a weaver of cloth, was noted for her beauty. Some three hundred years ago a Japanese poet composed a short poem, 'A fine Drizzle in Akita,' which relates to her beauty.

Xi Shi would sit on the bank of the Huansha River and wash yarn for her father. The rock where she washed the yarn is marked to this day by the calligraphy of Wang Xizji who lived during the Jin Dynasty.

The King of the Yue Kingdom, after losing a war (494 B. C.), chose Xi Shi for her beauty and, to save his Kingdom, sent her as a gift to the King of the Wu Kingdom.

The temple, now separated from the river by a modern street, was built, and named, in Xi Shi's honour.

THE XI SHI TEMPLE IN ZHUJI


A COURTYARD IN THE XI SHI TEMPLE

THE MAIN COURTYARD IN THE XI SHI TEMPLE

THIS TREE WAS CUT INTO SECTIONS AND RELOCATED
IT IS HELD TOGETHER WITH LARGE METAL STAPLES

XIE TIAN NING & CHEN JUN

TOSSING COINS INTO THE MOUTH OF THE FISH.
GOOD LUCK IS SURE TO COME IF YOU CAN GET IT TO STAY ON THE FISH'S TONGUE.
GOOD LUCK IS GUARANTEED IF YOU CAN DO IT WITH PAPER MONEY
PUTAS

STONE STEPS SEPARATE THE FISH PONDS

UNIVERSITY STUDENTS WAIT THEIR TURN TO WALK THE STEPS BETWEEN THE FISH PONDS

A UNIVERSITY STUDENT MAJORING IN ENGLISH.
SHE HAD NEVER MET A PERSON WHOSE NATIVE LANGUAGE WAS ENGLISH
TEMPLE?

ON TOP OF A HILL ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE RIVER.
IT LOOKS LIKE A TEMPLE BUT I NEVER FOUND OUT FOR SURE

The temple is very large and requires at least an hour to explore all the rooms and stairways. There are fountains where you try to toss coins into the mouths of fish statues. There is a large bell which, for a small fee, you can ring, the old fashioned way, with a small log.

Just before we left the temple we encountered some students from the Zhuji University on winter break. One of them was an English major and wanted to talk with me as I was the first English speaking person she had ever met.

From the temple we went to the market I had walked through earlier. Here I was accosted by vendors trying to sell me strings of pearls, pearl necklaces, earrings, and bracelets. In the end I bought a lovely pagoda made from strings of pearls with tiny lights throughout.

These pagodas are very common and can be found in most shops including the souvenir shops within the temple. They come in many sizes from 15 to 60 cm. The problem I encountered, when I reached home, was that they are designed to work on 220 volts.

PRODUCE MARKET (Pic. of market.)
The produce market in Zhuji

From this market we went to a produce market where I wandered about and attracted the attention, unwillingly, of several small children who followed me about, exhausting my meagre repertoire of the Chinese Language. To every thing they would say to me I would reply, "Ting Boo dong" (I don't comprehend). They would laugh and point at me, attracting the attention of the vendors in the various stalls.

Finally, tiring of this game I left the market and walked up the street but they continued to follow, actually hanging onto my coat tail while I made like a train engine. Pumping my arms, and bending my knees, I actually dragged them along the sidewalk for a way.

Eventually, by the time we had gone about two blocks, they grew tired of the game and returned to the market.

Walking back to the market, on the other side of the street, two more small children were attracted by my size and Caucasianous and followed me, asking questions and laughing at my reply of `Ting Boo Dong' interchanged with `Wah Bu Dong' (I don't know).

Joining up with my friends who had finished their shopping we returned to the home of Chen Jun's parents where my friends cooked supper.

Huang Yi Ming, who was studying to be a chef, before moving to Canada, and Shi Yun, who is a cook in a restaurant in Shanghai, prepared a meal fit for a king, or, being in China, maybe I should say, Emperor.

PICTURES TAKEN AT CHEN JUN'S PARENT'S HOME IN ZHUJI

BEDROOM

JUN CHEN'S BEDROOM
kitchen

IN THE MIDST OF PREPARATIONS FOR THE EVENING MEAL
CHEF DU JOUR

YI MING, AN EXPERIENCED CHEF,
PREPARES A MEAL FOR OUR HOSTS
DINNING ROOM

SHI YUN, A PROFESSIONAL COOK, SETS THE TABLE
AND ARRANGES THE FOOD, FISH, GRILLED SLICED CUCUMBER,
COLD SALTED DUCK, FRIED MUSHROOMS, COLD SLICED BEEF,
SCRAMBLED EGG WITH CHINESE SAUSAGE, SMALL EGGS,
CARROTS, TINY MEATBALLS, AND FISH SOUP
HOSTS

JUN CHEN AND HER PARENTS ENJOY A PROFESSIONALLY
PREPARED MEAL IN THEIR OWN HOME
refuse

MOST APARTMENT COMPLEXES HAVE A ROOM FOR GARBAGE
THERE IS NO BIN INSIDE
A SMALL TRUCK WILL COME AND THE MEN
WILL SHOVEL IT OFF THE FLOOR INTO THE TRUCK

Fish, grilled sliced cucumbers, salted cold duck, sliced grilled bamboo, cold chicken, fried mushroom, cold sliced beef, scrambled eggs with Chinese sausage, small eggs with egg, carrot and tiny meatball, fish soup,

After supper we took a taxi to the train station and returned to Shanghai. They were still selling standing room only tickets but we couldn't stay another night so we took what we could get only to find that they never sell seat tickets on Saturday and Sunday night because there are not enough passengers to fill all the seats.

END

JING DU HOTEL

(Pic. of hotel.)
  • 2 Star.
  • 90 Rooms.
  • Banquet room for over 500.
  • 3 Dinning areas, the Baihe Hall, the Haitang Hall, and the Seafood hall.
  • Western food.
  • Conference Hall.
  • Sitting room.
  • Business room. Fax, computer, photocopies, etc.
  • Beauty Salon.
  • Sauna.
  • Rates from Y280, standard room, - Y880, deluxe suite.
  • Children under 12 are free if sharing the same room.
  • Ph. 0575-7016688 Fax 0575-7016698
  • 38 Genta Rd. Zhuji, Zhejiang, China 311800
  • WUZHOU HOTEL (Pic. of hotel.)
    The hotel I stayed at the second night in Zhuji. 118 Jiyang Lu.
    Lower rates than the Jing Du but also fewer stars, probably none at all.

    END

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