Author's note:
(`7 & 11/5) All material on this website is covered by copyrite, .
Copy, in whole, or in part, without express permission of the author is illegal.

HIGHWAY 1

(Map of TCH in B. C.)
Author's note: Original map by
RAND McNALLY, butchered by Lee. A Wood

ALBERTA TO CACHE CREEK, B. C.

ADAMS LAKE
CAMBIE
CANOE
CHASE
CRAIGELLACHIE
FIELD
GOLDEN
KAMLOOPS
MALAKWA
PRITCHARD
REVELSTOKE
ROGER'S PASS
SALMON ARM
SAVONA
SHUSWAP
LAKE
SICAMOUS
SILVERY
BEACH
SORRENTO
TAPPEN
THREE VALLEY
WALHACHIN

I made many trips through the Roger’s Pass; Autumn, Spring, Summer, and Winter.

The following pictures were taken during those trips.

Some of the pictures were taken while I was facing East.

Basically I have arranged them from East to West.

(Yoho National Park, B.C. Canada - 2 lane highway, tall, snow capped, sheer, steep, Mtns. in background.)
LEAVING ALBERTA
( Yoho National Park, B.C. Canada - 2 lane highway, tall, snow capped, sheer, steep, Mtns. in background, tall trees, road side sign.)
THE ENTRANCE TO THE YOHO NATIONAL PARK IS ALSO
THE; EASTERN BOUNDARY OF B. C.,
THE WESTERN BOUNDARY OF ALBERTA,
THE WESTERN BOUNDARY OF BANFF NATIONAL PARK,
AND THE SUMMIT OF THE CONTINENTAL DIVIDE -
PEAK OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAINS.
(Yoho National Park, B.C. Canada - Highway, tall, snow capped, sheer, steep, Mtns.)
(Yoho National Park, B.C. Canada - Field, B.C. Highway, Wapta lake, Mtn.)
WAPTA LAKE, IN YOHO NATIONAL PARK, FORMED
BY THE WATERS OF CATARACT BROOK AND BLUE CREEK,
IS THE HEADWATERS FOR THE KICKING HORSE RIVER
(Yoho National Park, B.C. Canada - Field, B.C. Lodge, tall trees, snow.)
(Yoho National Park, B.C. Canada - Field, B.C. Highway, tall, snow capped, sheer, steep, Mtn.)
(Field, B.C. Canada - Highway, between Mtns.)
DOWN TO FIELD, B. C.
(Field, B.C. Canada - Kicking Horse river spreads out by highway, Mtns. in background.)
KICKING HORSE RIVER

This part of the river is a popular place for cross country skiers and hikers in the winter.

They like to calculate their paths over the blocks of snow created by the crisscrossing waters.

“(Field,
“(Field,
“(Field,
FIELD, B. C.
“(Field,
“(Field,
“(Field,
“(Field,
SOON TO BE THE HOME OF A MAJOR MUSEUM
“(Field,
“(Field,
“(Field,
“(Field,
LEAVING FIELD
“(Field,
“(Field,
`07/5 A MUD SLIDE CLOSED THE HIGHWAY
HERE THE LAST OF IT IS BEING CLEARED AWAY
“(Field,
MAYBE THEY SHOULD BUILD A SNOW SHED HERE
FOR ALL THE IMPATIENT MOTORISTS
“(Glacier
“(Glacier

(Glacier National Park, B. C.  Canada - Trans Canada Highway roadside building and sign, snow capped mts..)
GLACIER NATIONAL PARK
(Glacier National Park, B. C.  Canada - Trans Canada Highway roadside building and sign.)
(Glacier National Park, B. C.  Canada - snow capped mts.)

The following pictures were taken between May and August of `07 from the Trans Canada Highway that was completed in 1962.

Going West down Ten Mile Hill.

(Bridge goes over river at base of steep cliff.)
(Highway goes down steep hill to bridge.)
(Highway goes down steep hill to bridge.)
NOTE THE CORNER INTO THE RUNAWAY LANE
IF YOU WERE GOING FAST ENOUGH TO NEED A RUN-AWAY LANE
YOU WOULD BE GOING TOO FAST TO TURN A CORNER.
(Highway curves beside steep cliff.)

These next pictures were taken after the upgrade was completed.

Notice the difference in the rock cuts.

The new rock cuts are on the same mountain but above the old cuts.

(Golden, B. C. Trans Canada Highway - 4 lane divided highway, cloudy sky.)
FROM THE TOP OF `TEN MILE' HILL
(Golden, B. C. Trans Canada Highway – Highway Road curves beside steep cliff, narrow paved run way up side of cliff.)
A MORE INTELLIGENT RUN-AWAY LANE
(Golden, B. C. Trans Canada Highway - Road curves between two  steep cut cliffs.)
HOW MANY HOURS TO CUT ALL THAT ROCK?
(Golden, B. C. Trans Canada Highway - Road curves beside steep man cut cliff.)
(Golden, B. C. Trans Canada Highway - Road curves beside steep cliff.)
HOW DID THEY HANG THAT SIGN UP THERE?
(Golden, B. C. Trans Canada Highway - Road runs between two man cut cliffs.)
NOTE HOW THE `PARK BRIDGE' BLENDS
INTO THE HIGHWAY AT `TEN MILE HILL'
(Golden, B. C.. Trans Canada Highway - Road runs over new 6 lane bridge)
BELOW WERE THE OLD ROAD AND THE
CONSTRUCTION CAMP FOR THE NEW BRIDGE
(Golden, B. C. Trans Canada Highway - Road runs down side of tree covered mtn.)
THE NEW ROAD ABOVE THE OLD ROAD
(Golden, B. C. Trans Canada Highway - Road runs down side of tree covered mtn)

TEN MILE HILL
(Golden, B. C. Trans Canada Highway - Road curves beside steep side of tree covered mtn.)

The first 20 kilometers East of Golden are; narrow, steep, and winding. This stretch of highway has been a death trap for many a motorist.
Not unlike other highways in B.C. that are built into solid rock and are much too expensive, and/or impracticable to widen, and/or straighten.
However, after much pressure from people who don't know how to drive, the government, at great expense to us poor taxpayers are attempting to rebuild this section of road.
Personally, I believe it would be much cheaper to teach people how to drive.
But what do I know? I'm only a professional driver who has been driving these roads for over 40 years.
I first came through this stretch of road when it was first being built. We spent many an hour, sitting in our car, while they blasted the rock to make the road that today is too dangerous.
How happy were the motorists in 1962 when PM (Prime Minister) the Right Honourable John Diefenbaker opened the Rogers' Pass, and they no longer had to traverse the Big Bend Hwy.
The Big Bend was; not paved, only open in the summer, and took 8 hours to traverse.

The following pictures were taken of the construction of the Park Bridge on Ten Mile Hill

PARK BRIDGE 2007

( Golden, B. C. Canada - Tall concrete towers with tall cranes on top, bridge decking being placed between towers.)
( Golden, B. C. Canada - Tall concrete towers with tall cranes on top, bridge decking being placed between towers.)
( Golden, B. C. Canada - Tall concrete towers with tall cranes on top, bridge decking being placed between towers.)
( Golden, B. C. Canada - Tall concrete towers with tall cranes on top, bridge decking being placed between towers.)

The next 15 kilometers into Golden were, at the time of this writing, still very narrow and treacherous.
Since then it has been repaved, and, maybe, rebuilt.

(Golden, highway between businesses.)
KICKING HORSE RIVER
(Golden, B. C. Canada - 4 lane highway goes down, steep, between steep rock cliffs.)
YOHO BRIDGE 2006
(Golden, B. C.  Canada - Trans Canada Highway curves beside steep cliff, Huge metal nets drape the cliff side to keep rock from falling on cars.)
LARGE NETS PREVENT ROCK FROM FALLING ON CARS
NEVER STOP, OR PARK, ALONG SUCH AREAS
(Golden, B. C.  Canada - Trans Canada Highway curves beside <tr>steep cliff, a tight corner curves around a pinnacle of rock.)
(Golden, B. C.  Canada - Trans Canada Highway curves beside steep cliff, a tractor trailer, pulls a steep hill and a sharp bend in the road.)
(Golden, B. C.  Canada - Trans Canada Highway curves beside steep cliff.)
(Golden, B. C.  Canada - Trans Canada Highway curves beside a long drop to a treed valley, a sheep hug the outside of a traffic barrier.)
(Golden, B. C.  Canada - Trans Canada Highway curves beside a wide turn out filled with sheep.)
THE CONSTRUCTION HASN'T SEEMED TO HAVE BOTHERED
THESE ROCKY MOUNTAIN SHEEP

More than once I have had to stop on this corner while the sheep slowly wanderer across, often stopping directly in front of me while they lick the salt off the highway.
Of course, my camera was at home, or had a dead battery.
And the next time some dickhead tries to pass me, while I am stopped for these beautiful creatures, he is going to find my 3' snipe coming through his windshield.

(Golden, B.C. Canada  - snow topped Mtns. in background.)
(Golden, B.C. CANADA  - down hill, buildings, snow topped Mtns. in background.)
GOLDEN
(Golden, B.C. Canada - looking down on buildings, snow topped Mtns. in background.)
(Golden, B.C. CANADA - looking down on buildings, snow topped Mtns. in background.)
(Golden, B.C. Canada - looking down on buildings, snow topped Mtns. in background.)
(Golden, B.C. Canada - looking down on buildings, snow topped Mtns. in background.)
(Golden, B.C. Canada  - looking down on buildings, snow topped Mtns. in background.)
(Golden, B.C. Canada  - highway between businesses.)
(Golden, B.C. Canada  - field of trees, snow topped Mtns. in background.)
LEAVING GOLDEN
(Golden, B.C. Canada  - fields, snow topped Mtns. in background.)

(Golden, B. C. Donald, B. C. remains of a sawmill.)
REMAINS OF A SAWMILL CENTER CALLED, `DONALD'
(Roger's Pass, tall Mtn. behind trees.)
(Roger's Pass, tall Mtn. behind trees.)
(Roger's Pass, tall trees line road, tall Mtn. behind trees.)
(Roger's Pass, tall trees line road, tall Mtn. behind trees.)
(Roger's Pass, tall trees line road, tall Mtn. behind trees.)
(Roger's Pass, truck ahead, inside a snow shed.)
(Roger's Pass, approaching a snow shed.)
(Roger's Pass, a truck entering a snow shed.)
(Roger's Pass, truck ahead, inside a snow shed.)
(Roger's Pass, tall trees line road, tall Mtn. behind trees.)
APPROACHING THE SUMMIT - WEST BOUND
(Roger's Pass, tall trees line road, tall Mtn. behind trees, buildings at base of hill.)
(Roger's Pass, tall trees line road, tall Mtn. behind trees, buildings at base of hill.)
GLACIER PARK LODGE
(Roger's Pass, tall trees line road, tall Mtn. behind trees.)
APPROACHING THE SUMMIT - EAST BOUND

When our school class took a bus trip, I, and a couple of fellow students, climbed the hill behind the memorial. We buried a small time capsule, an empty soda bottle with a note in it.
I have no idea if any of us have ever returned to the spot. I know I don't remember the exact spot, nor what the note said.

(Roger's Pass Summit sign tells about avalanches.)
(Roger's Pass, cone shaped beams near side of road.)
THE ROGERS PASS WAS COMPLETED IN 1962
THIS CENOTAPH MARKS THE OCCASION
PRIME MINISTER JOHN DIEFENBAKER CUT THE RIBBON
MY FATHER AND MOTHER ATTENDED THE CEREMONY
(Roger's Pass, rock wall on side of road, water cascading down.)
(Roger's Pass, tall trees line road, tall Mtn. behind trees.)
(Roger's Pass, snow topped Mtn.)
SLIDE AREAS ARE VERY BEAUTIFUL
DO NOT STOP TO TAKE PICTURES
THEY ARE VERY DANGEROUS AREAS
(Roger's Pass, approaching a snow shed.)
(Roger's Pass, approaching a snow shed.)
ONE OF MANY SNOW SHEDS ON BOTH SIDES OF THE
SUMMIT - SNOW SHEDS ALLOW ROCK AND/OR SNOW
TO PASS OVER THE ROAD, AND VEHICLES
(Roger's Pass, truck approaching, inside a snow shed.)
MOST OF THE SNOW SHEDS ARE LIT, DAY AND NIGHT
SOME AREN'T, SO BE SURE TO USE YOUR HEADLIGHTS

(Revelstoke National Park - between tall trees, tall Mtn. in background.)
THIS LITTLE VALLEY, IN THE `70S,
WAS THE SCENE OF A TREMENDOUS WIND.
THOUSANDS OF TREES WERE BLOWN DOWN
(Revelstoke National Park - Sign and small building.)
ENTERING MOUNT REVELSTOKE NATIONAL PARK
(Revelstoke National Park -  Snow topped Mtn.)
(Revelstoke National Park -  Snow capped Mtn. West of town.)
(Revelstoke National Park - Tall trees line road, tall Mtn. behind trees, East of Revelstoke.)
APPROACHING REVELSTOKE
(Revelstoke National Park - between tall trees, tall Mtn. in background.)
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada - Snow topped Mtn.)
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada - buildings hidden in trees.)
REVELSTOKE
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada - Looking down on town from upper highway, snow capped mts. in background.)
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada - Looking down on town from upper highway.)
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada - Looking down on town from upper highway, snow capped mts. in background.)
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada - buildings, snow capped Mtn. in background.)
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada - Main intersection on highway.)
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada - Main intersection on highway.)

ON THE EAST END OF THE BRIDGE AND THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE HIGHWAY IS A SMALL PARK
I didn't meet the man who made this but I remember seeing it when it was raw wood, unpainted, and sitting in its original location near `Boat Encampment', which was the half way point between Golden and Revelstoke, on the Big Bend Highway.
I would have been about 8, give or take a couple of years, at the time.
This is not the original woodenhead, nor is it even wood. This is a fiberglass replica.
(Like the `
Mr. PG’ in Prince George) it has had to be replaced with modern materials and doesn’t have the same look as the original.
The original woodenhead, carved in the early `50’s rotted away many years ago.

(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada - Woodenhead.)
WOODENHEAD
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada -  Woodenhead.)
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada - Woodenhead.)
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada - Woodenhead.)
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada - highway approaches a tall, narrow, steel, bridge.)
LEAVING REVELSTOKE - WEST BOUND
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada - view from bridge.)
LOOKING SOUTH ALONG THE COLUMBIA RIVER
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada - Columbia River, from the bridge.)
LOOKING NORTH ALONG THE COLUMBIA RIVER
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada - plaque at end of bridge.)
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada - bridge.)
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada - highway approaches a tall, narrow, steel, bridge.)
ENTERING REVELSTOKE - EAST BOUND
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada - sign at end of bridge.)

(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada - Series of shots of mtn. tops covered with snow in rising sun, clear blue sky, steep Mtns.)
THIS WAS SHOT FROM THE ROAD SIDE REST AREA AT THE WEST END OF THE REVELSTOKE BRIDGE
IT GIVES YOU AN IDEA OF THE MAJESTIC MOUNTAINS THAT CITIZENS OF REVELSTOKE
GET TO ENJOY EVERY (WINTER) MORNING

(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada – Large wooden bear in snow beside road.)
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada – Clear sky, snow capped steep Mtns., narrow canyon, train and 2 lane highway through snow and trees)
THERE IS A TRAIN ON THE TRACKS
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada – Early sun dapples windshield as we cross over a metal bridge.)
THE EARLY MORNING SUN DAPPLES
THE BUGS ON MY WINDSHIELD
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada – steep tree covered hill side, train tunnel, snow covered lake.)
THERE IS A TRAIN TUNNEL ON THE FAR END
OF THE SNOW COVERED LAKE
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada - Lake between steep Mtns., train tunnel, snow covered lake. Two lane road.)
TOO EARLY FOR THE SUN TO REACH
THE BOTTOM OF THE CANYON
(Revelstoke, B. C. Canada - Lake between steep Mtns., snow covered lake. Two lane road.)

Years before the Roger's Pass was even conceived of, my family and I made a trip over the Big Bend Highway, the road between Golden and Revelstoke. It was, basically, a logging road, and only open in the summer.

I don't recall which type of vehicle we had but it was pulling a small trailer that had once been a luggage cart at the airport in Edmonton.

After we had passed `Boat Encampment' which was the peak of the bend in the river and about half way through the Selkirk Mountains, a wheel came off the trailer.

We had to walk back and find the wheel and it took a lot of looking because we were looking on the wrong side of the road.

The strange thing was that the wheel came off the passenger side of the trailer and ended up on the driver's side of the road.

Now this was a good thing because the passenger side of the road was a steep cliff, several hundred feet down to the Columbia River. The driver's side of the road was a sheer wall gong up, hundreds of feet.

We put the wheel back on the hub. Father drove slow while I watched out the back window. When I saw the wheel moving over the hub, I would tell dad and he would swing the car the other way and the wheel would go back on. However this only worked a couple of times, until we were in a narrow corner where father couldn't turn the car and the wheel came off again.

The problem was that there was a hole in the end of the hub where a cotter pin should be.

The pin had worn away. A motorist who stopped to help us look for the wheel suggested using a nail, and he happened to have one.

Merrily, we proceeded on our way.

Looking out the back window I could see the wheel coming off and I told dad but he thought I was joking, "The nail will hold it, It can't get off now."

The wheel came off.

The wheel had bent the nail and slid over top of it.

We put it all back together, straightened the nail, and kept our eye on it until we got to Revelstoke.

In Revelstoke we found a shop and had a nut welded onto the hub.

On our way to Sicamous Father would tease me, "Have a look out and see if the wheel is still on." I didn't look.

Several miles West of Revelstoke, just East of Griffin Lake, was a small lake on the driver's side of the car.

The wheel came off the trailer and disappeared into the lake.

We dragged the trailer into a turn out beside the lake and loaded all our stuff into the car.

For years, every time we went past the lake, the little trailer was still sitting there.

(Clanwilliam Lake, B. C. - Lake between steep Mtns.)
CLANWILLIAM LAKE?
(Griffin Lake, B. C. - Lake between steep Mtns.)
GRIFFIN LAKE
(3 valley gap, B. C. – Road & signs between steep snow covered Mtns.)
APPROACHING 3 VALLEY GAP
(3 valley gap, B. C. - Lake between steep Mtns. 3 valley gap, buildings at end of lake.)
THREE VALLEY MUSEUM
(3 valley gap, B. C. - Road & buildings between steep snow covered Mtns.)
3 VALLEY CHATEAU & RESTAURANT
(3 valley gap, B. C. -.)
(3 valley gap, B. C. – Ice covered lake between steep, snow capped Mtns.)
3 VALLEY LAKE
(3 valley gap, B. C. - Lake between steep Mtns. buildings at end of lake.)
THREE VALLEY LAKE, 3 VALLEY GAP, &
3 VALLEY LAKE CHATEAU

(Three Valley Lake, B. C. – House on hill side, cabin on lake shore.)
A BEAUTIFUL LITTLE CABIN ON THE END OF THE LAKE
( Three Valley Lake, B. C. – House on hill side, cabin on lake shore.)
A LOVELY HOME ABOVE
(Taft, B. C. Highway goes over a train.)
19 MILE OVERHEAD
(Taft, B. C. – Building roof appears above snow bank.)
TAFT, B. C.
ALMOST DUE NORTH OF TAFT, WASHINGTON

( Taft, B. C. – Building roof appears above snow bank.)
BOTH ARE SIMILAR,
CONSTRUCTION BELOW THE ROAD
( Taft, B. C. – Building roof appears above snow bank.)
MILES FROM ANYTHING ELSE
I HAVE NO IDEA WHAT EITHER IS FOR
(Sign for Enchanted Forest tourist stop.)
APPROACHING
THE
ENCHANTED
FOREST

(Enchanted Forest tourist stop.)
I HAVEN'T STOPPED IN FOR MANY YEARS
(Enchanted Forest tourist stop.)
BUT I HAVE HAPPY MEMORIES OF PREVIOUS VISITS
(Enchanted Forest tourist stop.)
ENCHANTED FOREST - A WORTHWHILE STOP
(Enchanted Forest tourist stop.)

(Craigellachie, B.C. - Beardale Castle tourist stop.)
PERRY RIVER - APPROACHING BEARDALE
(Craigellachie, B.C. - Beardale Castle tourist stop.)
BEARDALE CASTLE
(Craigellachie, B.C. - Esso truck stop buildings by highway.)
SKYLINE TRUCK STOP - CRAIGELLACHIE, BC
(Craigellachie, B.C. - Little church buildings by highway.)
(Malakwa, B. C.  buildings by highway.)
THE BURNERS
(Malakwa, B. C.  buildings by highway.)
AN OLD BEE HIVE BURNER
TURNED INTO A NEIGHBORHOOD PUB
(Malakwa, B. C. buildings by highway.)
MALAKWA
(Cambie, B. C.  buildings by highway.)
(Cambie, B. C.  buildings by highway.)
(Cambie, B. C. buildings by highway.)
(Cambie, B. C. buildings by highway.)
CAMBIE, B. C. ?
(Cambie, B. C. buildings by highway.)
(Cambie, B. C. – House in snow beside highway, clear blue sky.)
(Cambie, B. C. – Store n snow beside highway, clear blue sky.)
(Cambie, B. C. – Cranes, and buildings in snow beside highway, clear blue sky, Mtns. in background.)
(Cambie, B. C. - buildings in snow beside highway, clear blue sky, Mtns. in background.)
(Sicamous, B. C. green field by highway.)
(Sicamous, B. C. highway follows water.)
EAGLE RIVER

(Sicamous, B. C. Welcome sign on side of highway)
WELCOME TO
SICAMOUS

A BEAUTIFUL VILLAGE BETWEEN TWO BEAUTIFUL LAKES

In British Columbia, between Revelstoke and Salmon arm, due West of Calgary, Alberta, is Sicamous, smack dab on the Trans Canada Highway.
At least it used to be until they built the new bridge.
Now traffic goes whizzing by on the new bypass and doesn't see other than the few traffic oriented businesses, ie. truck stops, motels, etc., that have sprung up along the new frontage road, until they pop out of the trees onto the bridge.

For a few brief moments one is awe struck by the spectacular view of water and mountains and a quaint little community nestled along the shore of what is a channel connecting Mara Lake to the Shuswap lakes.
I say community because it was not a town.
It was not even big enough to be a village.
It was what is known as unincorporated, which is good because then the provincial Gov't. pays for street maintenance, etc.

(Sicamous, B. C. highway between buildings beneath trees on Mtns.)
ENTERING SICAMOUS
(Sicamous, B. C. highway between buildings.)
(Sicamous, B. C. highway between buildings.)
(Sicamous, B. C. Pink clouds above Mtns. west of Sicamous)
NOT A FIRE - JUST THE SETTING SUN

(Sicamous, B. C. mock houseboat beside highway.)
SICAMOUS IS KNOW AS THE
HOUSEBOAT CAPITAL OF THE WORLD

In the early `60's the Government had made plans to build a canal from Enderby, through Armstrong, to Vernon.

This would connect the Shuswap River with the Okanagan lake.

They were also going to dredge the Shuswap River from Enderby to Mara Lake.

This would have put Enderby in the middle of a pleasure waterway that would stretch from Kamloops to Penticton.

My father, at this time, owned an insurance agency.

He insured a new company called Twin Anchors Marina.

Twin Anchors built a home, office, and assembly plant on the river, not far from our house in Enderby. Several years went buy and the government never dredged the river which meant during low water the houseboats could not get from Enderby to Grindrod, Mara Lake, or vice versa.

Eventually Twin Anchors moved to Sicamous.

MAIN STREET

(Sicamous, B. C. Newer school building.)
THIS SCHOOL HAS GROWN A LOT SINCE I WENT THERE
(Sicamous, B. C. street between buildings.)
THIS USED TO BE THE TRANS CANADA HIGHWAY
(Sicamous, B. C. street between buildings.)
(Sicamous, B. C.  street between buildings. Cenotaph in center of intersection)
THIS STREET NOW ENDS AT THE WATER
BUT IT USED TO LEAD TO A WOODEN BRIDGE

RIVERSIDE AVENUE

(Sicamous, B. C. highway between buildings.)
I BELIEVE THIS USED TO BE THE FIRE HALL
(Sicamous, highway between buildings.)
MY SISTER AND I WON MANY PRIZES
AT THURSDAY NIGHT BINGO

FINLAYSON STREET

(Sicamous, B. C. a store with rubber rafts out front.)
AT FIRST GLANCE IT LOOKS LIKE A HALLOWEEN STORE
(Sicamous, B. C. street between buildings.)

SILVER SANDS

(Sicamous, B. C. looking up at a bridge.)
THE NEW BRIDGE, BUILT IN 1962 – 63
A school mate of mine, Raymond I. of Enderby, B.C., driving for
Baird Brs. of Enderby, helped supply the sand and rock for the decking.
Another school mate of mine, Brian B. of Sicamous, who, like I,
was a new SCUBA diver, was helping, beneath the waves.
He had to leave one of his flippers behind when it got caught between two forms.
(Sicamous, B. C. two bridges over a narrow channel.)
THE NEW TRANS CANADA HIGHWAY BRIDGE,
ABOVE THE CPR BRIDGE, CROSSES THE CHANNEL
BETWEEN MARA AND SHUSWAP LAKES
(Sicamous, B. C. plaque on a rock cairn.)
(Sicamous, B. C.  small pedestrian bridge)
BRIDGE TO SILVER SANDS BEACH AND SUBDIVISION
(Sicamous, B. C. buildings on the shore of an inlet.)
(Sicamous, B. C.  beach and large lake)
SILVER SANDS BEACH ON SHUSWAP LAKE

HIGHWAY 97A - SICAMOUS - VERNON HIGHWAY

(Sicamous, B. C. highway between buildings.)
OUR DRIVEWAY MEANDERED THROUGH THE TREES
TO A LARGE HOUSE ON THE BEACH OF MARA LAKE

Wilderness and camping was not new to my sibling and I. Our father often took us out of the city to pick wild berries, mom made a most delicious choke cherry jelly, or to tour the neighbouring province.

In those days getting to Sicamous, though it is located on the TCH (Trans Canada Highway) was not a simple trip. The Roger's Pass had not yet been built and the trip between Golden and Revelstoke took some eight to ten hours on; arduous, narrow, rough, often corduroy, road.

When we first visited the house, the realtor, based in Enderby, BC. took us by boat up Mara Lake, from Grindrod, to Sicamous. The road from Grindrod to Sicamous did not exist at that time.

When we moved to this lovely house, the second most Southern abode on the lake, South of town, we used camping gear as our furniture wouldn't arrive until late September.

(Sicamous, B. C. highway between buildings.)
NOT SURE IF THIS WAS OUR DRIVEWAY BUT IT IS CLOSE TO IT

North of the highway was the industrial section with sawmills and a pole yard.
A pole yard is a yard where they make and store poles.
Poles are made from logs (Logs are made by cutting the branches and tops off of trees, after you cut them down) that are long enough and straight enough to be used to hold up power and / or phone lines.
Such logs are turned into poles by simply stripping off the bark, after which some poles are treated with a preservative such as creosote.
In the pole yard was a siding, a spur line from the railroad, where the poles were loaded onto railcars.
When we first moved to Sicamous there was a tank car filled with liquid asphalt sitting on the siding in the pole yard.
Asphalt is loaded into tank cars at the refinery at, from 550 to 900, degrees F. (I have no idea what that is in C. I failed Russian 101 ).
Below 500 degrees asphalt starts to solidify.
It makes it difficult to pave streets if you can't get the asphalt out of the tank cars.
To keep the asphalt liquid they connected a portable boiler to the tank car.
Guess who they got to fire the boiler.

When we lived in Sicamous there was no road between Sicamous and Grindrod (Okanagan Valley).
My father worked as a powder man, blasting the rocks along the shore of the lake to build the Northern end of Hwy 97 A. As we were one of the last houses along the road South of town we would be warned to open our windows before a blast was set off (To avoid window breakage due to compression from the blast.). Us children would immediately head for the lake.
When we saw; the smoke, and the boulders, fly from the cliff face we would stick our heads underwater and listen to the sound of; the blast, and the rocks hitting the water. Then, quickly, we would rise out of the water and listen to the sound of the blast reverberating between the surrounding mountains.

(Sicamous, B. C. buildings on Shuswap lake shore, Mtns. in background.)
THE RAILWAY BRIDGE SWINGS OPEN
TO ALLOW THE PASSAGE OF HOUSEBOATS
(Sicamous, buildings on Shuswap lake shore.)
Follow this shore line for 1 Km. and you will find the house where I lived when I was 10.
(Sicamous, highway approaches a narrow, steel, bridge.)
APPROACHING SICAMOUS - EAST BOUND
(Canoe, B. C. Trees by twisting highway.)
IMAGINE THIS ROAD, AFTER DARK,
NARROWER, NO PAVEMENT, OLD CAR,
MY FATHER RUSHING ME TO THE HOSPITAL

After two hitches and thirty-five years of service my father had retired, as a Corporal, from the Force.
We had packed our belongings and moved out of the city.
Now when I say moved that should conjure up visions of packing your goods and trundling along the street to a new residence where you would unpack.
I don't recall the packing or the trundling but I do remember starting school and still sleeping in sleeping bags because our furniture hadn't arrived.
So, for me, we hadn't really moved, we were just on an extra long camping trip.
I also remember the arrival of our furniture.
A large, yellow, tractor trailer (MacCosham Van Lines) that had one hell, I wasn't allowed to use that word then, (isn't growing up great?) of a time negotiating our long, narrow, twisting, drive way.
I also remember how upset my mother was when the truck finally had to drive in, rather than back in, and then turn around in mom's garden.
The driveway came into the back of the house from the road.
The front of the ranch style house faced Mara Lake.

In the late afternoons my mother would load us children and a hot supper, corn on the cob, roast beef, and boiled potatoes, kept warm in a pressure cooker, into the car and we would have a picnic, with my father, in the pole yard, where he was in charge of the boiler that kept the tank car warm.
The road from the pole yard to our house was gravel, it went past the school and past our house but not much further, and it was hard to ride on my bicycle.
My bicycle didn't have gears and it had wide, fat tires.
But at least there were no hills.
One day as I was riding home my father passed me in his car and tooted his horn, which startled me and I went into the ditch.
To this day I never honk my horn when passing a bike, or (especially) a horse, but I always slow down and go wide, if possible.

Where we lived there were few houses and even fewer people.
On one side of us we could make out a cabin through the trees and on the other side we could make out a house.
Both were empty most of the year as they were summer and weekend residences for people from Revelstoke, during the summer.

There was a boy about my age that lived in the cabin and we chummed around, swimming and hiking.
One day we went hiking to a place that my neighbour knew about, a forestry lookout on top of the mountain behind our house.
What a beautiful climb, what a beautiful view.
We were gone for hours and we hadn't told anyone where we were going.
When I got home I got `the belt'.
My parents had no idea where we had gone and they had the police looking for us.

As I stated earlier the Trans Canada Highway passed through town from Revelstoke to Salmon Arm.
You could carry on to Vancouver but it was a tortuous journey.
We never went.

You could go back to Calgary, in the summer.
You could go West to Salmon Arm and then South to Vernon and Kelowna via Enderby and from Enderby you could go North as Far as Grindrod but there was no road from Grindrod to Sicamous, but they were working on it.

In the fall, after the paving was done, they moved the boiler from the pole yard to the highway, South of our house, where they were building bridges.
My father would work nights stoking the boiler to keep the concrete from freezing.

It got cold in Sicamous, not as cold as in Alberta, but it was a damp cold so it felt just as cold.
Sicamous gets a lot more snow than Alberta so I couldn't ride my bike to school.

The school was a two room wooden building with a pot bellied stove in each room.
The students would take turns bringing in the wood for the stove.
By recess time the sides of the stove would be glowing cherry red.
By noon, the ink in our ink bottles would be thawed out around the edges. We could dip our pens.
By early afternoon the room would be warm enough that we could take our scarves off and later we could take our coats off, just about the time we put them back on to go home.

The washroom consisted of a little wooden house on the far side of the playground.
It had two doors, one for girls and one for boys.

In our room we had one teacher and grades one to four.
In my sister's room they had one teacher and grades five to eight.
In the spring they started to build a new school and we got to use it for the last month of school.

Each morning our teacher would have each row stand up and she would check to see if we had brushed our teeth, combed our hair, and had brought a hanky.
The row with the best participation would get a star on the chart.
I never brought a handkerchief.
Not because I forgot, though I said I did, but because I knew the pretty girl behind me, would ask me, before the teacher, and would then give me a tissue so our row wouldn't lose points.

J. was the second crush of my life.
She lived on the lake, North of us.
The only time I ever saw her was in school.

One day the teacher, from the next room, brought in a bat hanging from a tree branch.
After it had been passed around the room so that everyone could see, our teacher finally came to the realization, that it was still alive and went, screaming, out of the room.
The bat continued to sleep.

My room, at home, was directly beneath that of my parents and was heated by a gas space heater which glowed and hissed all night.
My sister would use the cover of the hissing to sneak down the stairs and scare me.
One evening, after my parents were asleep, the window above my bed partly open for fresh air, my sister crept down the stairs.
As she entered my room she looked up to see a terrifying face in my window.
I don't know who screamed first, the cougar or my sister but definitely the cat's scream was louder.
It not only woke up my parents but also the neighbours, we were told the next day.
To this day you can't scare me.
If you sneak up on me, which is pretty hard to do as I have good hearing and fantastic peripheral vision, I may jump if you say boo, but it is only to play the game.
We lived in a forest and wild animals; bear, deer, and cougar were constantly coming down our driveway, and through our carport, to the lake, to drink.
I suppose we did the usual things that most people do when they first move to a beach property: collect sea shells, not too many on a fresh water beach, though my sister would wade out to the drop off, the point where the bottom of the lake would drop into the deep, and find clams; collect driftwood; fish. 
My father would rent an old boat with an inboard Briggs and Stratton motor and we would putt along with fishing lines dragging in our wake (boring).
I can still see the scar on my leg where I brushed against the exhaust pipe which ran through the side of the boat.
My sister and I had a much more practical, and entertaining, way of fishing.
Besides which it was quieter and non polluting.
Father made us a wooden frame to which was stretched a piece of mosquito netting.
We would stand waist deep in the lake.
Bread squeezed into the netting would act as bait.
Holding the netting about a foot below the surface we could watch the minnows and fingerlings swim into the net, we could also feel them nibbling at our legs.
Then quickly lifting the net we would have a screen covered with little fish.
I have no idea what we did with them, after we caught them, probably put them in jars like most children do with spiders and bees.

My father made friends with some people who lived closer to town.
They had two boys, one of whom was my age and we chummed around.
His father worked for the railway and we would sometimes accompany him, early in the morning, when he would go to the round house and start the fires in the huge boilers of the steam engines.
How I miss the haunting refrain of the old steam whistles.
At that time they were widening the Trans Canada Highway and about a half mile down the road from us a construction company had set up a camp.
Huge Euclid trucks without mufflers would wake us up at five in the morning when they started warming up their engines for the days work.
Also at that time they were building the road along the lake between Sicamous and Grindrod.
My father was hired to be the powder man.
It was his job to stick the dynamite in the holes and blow the rocks off the cliff.
Before my father would explode the charge he would drive to the houses in the neighbourhood and warm them to open their windows so the blast wouldn't break the glass.
That was the cue for us children to run to the lake.
Standing shoulder deep in the water we could look down, or is that up, the lake and see the outcrop of mountain where my father was working.
Suddenly the entire area would be obscured by a rolling cloud of dust and debris.
Huge rocks would shoot soundlessly out of the cloud, light travels much faster than sound, and sail through the air to drop into the water making big sprays of water.
We would bend our knees and slip quietly beneath the surface of the water.
There we would hear the rumble and roar of the explosion followed by the patter of debris falling on the surface and then the hard splashes as the big rocks and boulders fell into the lake.
Quickly raising our heads out of the water we would hear a repeat performance, sound travels faster in water than it does through air.
The sound of the blast would be repeated as the noise hit the mountain on the far side of the lake, and repeated again as the echo would bounce off the mountain above the construction, and yet again as it traveled back across the water a second time.
A symphony of kettle drums orchestrated by my father with natural acoustics.

In the summer the adults up and down the beach would try to clean their section of beach by piling the wood that had drifted in during high water.
Each night, while us children swam in the clear water, each family would have a fire on the beach.
Inevitably neighbours would gather, marshmallows would be roasted, and friends would be made.
It was this way that I met my first foreigners.
Three families had moved North from the United States of America and bought beach homes North of us.
One of the boys was my age and we spent a lot of time together.
He had a canoe and we spent some time paddling it around but we spent more time trying to sink it.
We would fill it full of water and rocks and settle it to the bottom of the lake.
We would swim down, wrap our legs around the cross members, and play submarine for as long as we could hold our breath.
One weekend his cousin came up from the States, nothing to do with the movie `My American Cousin', that was filmed two or three lakes South of us, and several years later.
His cousin could water ski, boy could he.
He would come flying in towards the dock, let go of the tow rope a split second before he hit the wharf, jump up, turn around, and sit down on the dock.
He tried to teach me to water ski, time and time again they tried to pull me off the wharf and all I would accomplish was lowering the level of the lake by drinking half of it.
Finally we gave up and went for lunch.
After lunch we skipped the wharf and tried lifting me from the water.
I was up and away first try.
Zooming across the lake.
What a thrill, what exhilaration.
What depression, as I sit here writing this and realize that only twice more in my life did I ever water ski and the memories don't bring back the carefree happy feeling of that first time.
I think my whole life has been downhill, despite the stitches in my forehead, since that one year we spent at the lake.

Sicamous is only thirty miles from Revelstoke which gets the highest snowfalls in B. C.
In the winter the lake would freeze over and we would shovel snow.
Much too much snow to shovel off the area for a rink so we would shovel paths then skate and / or play tag along the narrow criss crossing corridors. When you caught up to someone you tagged them by pushing them, off the path, into the snow.

Where from I know not, but my father acquired a huge stove for the kitchen.
Four burners and an oven that used propane and four burners and an oven that used wood.
The kitchen and my room are all I remember of the interior of the house.

In the kitchen was a double sink.
We partially filled one side with water and tried to raise two baby ducks.
There had been a terrible storm the night before and friends of our parents who lived down the lake saw a mother duck go berserk and start stomping on her brood.
They only managed to rescue two.
We tried to hand feed them but after a couple of days one died, although maybe our cat got it.
The second one, being lonely, wouldn't eat anymore and it too passed away.

In the spring we would lay a trail of bread crumbs from the beach to our house.
Baby ducks would work their way right up to our door and eat out of our hands.
The mother would stay at the bottom of the stairs and glare at us.

My father cleared some small trees along the driveway and cut it into firewood for the stove.
My sister and I were relegated the job of bringing it into the house.
Because I had played around all day it was after supper and after dark and my father insisted I finish my chores.
I was still playing around with the boy next door, we were throwing rocks into the woods and pretending to scare out ghosts, then we would run from the ghosts.
I threw a rather big rock into a dark area and heard the crashing in the brush as the rock broke small branches.
This obviously chased out some rather scary spooks and I went running down the lane yelling "Ghost, ghost".
I ran into a stone. My neighbour had thrown a small stone, towards a clump of bush.

The nearest doctor was thirty-five miles away, in Salmon Arm, and the road in daylight was treacherous.
Winding, narrow, with many steep hills.
My father was not pleased with having to negotiate it after dark.

Different from any other stitches I ever had, these were made of metal.
Five small, nail like, objects were put through the lacerated skin of my forehead.
Later the ends were cut off and the middles were left to be absorbed by my body.
The lumps are gone now after all these years but it took a long time.
For nearly twenty years I could run my hand over my forehead and count the little lumps in the skin though there was no scar left on my head.

My father had actually moved to Sicamous to take up the position of police magistrate but in such a small community there probably weren't enough law breakers to support the position, which is probably why my father was working at other jobs as well.
While in Sicamous he also worked as a finishing carpenter, building kitchen cupboards in peoples homes.

After only 1 year of living in paradise our family moved back to Edmonton.
At the time we moved from Sicamous the TCH was a summer route only through to Alberta, and not advisable for large trucks.
Our furniture truck went from Sicamous to Salmon Arm, then South, to go East.

* * * * * * * * * * *

(Sicamous, B. C. Large deep blue lake, clear blue sky.)
SHUSWAP LAKE
(Canoe, B. C. Large lumber mill.)
CANOE
(Canoe, B. C. large sawmill, Mtns in the background.)
Federated Co-Operatives Ltd Canoe Lumber & Plywood
(Canoe, B. C. Bulk fuel tanks.)
NOTE THE OLD BEE HIVE BURNER IN THE MIDDLE
AT ONE TIME ALL LARGE MILLS HAD ONE
THE SPARKS FLYING OUT OF THE TOP CAUSED
MANY FOREST FIRES
EVENTUALLY THEY WERE OUTLAWED
(Canoe, B. C. Downhill, to Canoe, Mtns. in the background.)
(Salmon Arm, B. C. – Curve in highway, snow topped Mtns in the background.)
(Salmon Arm, B. C. - Downhill, Enderby junction, Mtns. in the background.)
JUNCTION OF HWY. 97B - TO ENDERBY
(Salmon Arm, B. C. – Trees and buildings in snow, clear blue sky.)
APPROACHING SALMON ARM
 Salmon Arm, B. C. – Shopping centre beside 4 lane st., Mtns. in the background.)
(Salmon Arm, B. C. – 4 lane, divided st., going down hill to lake Mtns. in the background.)

(Salmon Arm, B. C. - Looking down on buildings of Salmon Arm below highway.)
(Salmon Arm, B. C. - Looking down on buildings of Salmon Arm below the highway.)
(Salmon Arm, B. C. - Looking down on buildings of Salmon Arm below the highway.)
(Salmon Arm, B. C. - Looking down on buildings of Salmon Arm below the highway.)
(Salmon Arm, B. C. - Looking down on buildings of Salmon Arm below the highway.)
A LAKE CLOSE TO A LAKE
THE SMALL ONE COVERED WITH ICE
(Salmon Arm, B. C. - Looking down on colourful fountain in lake, below the highway.)
IN SUMMER THE SMALL LAKE HAS A COLOURFUL FOUNTAIN
(Salmon Arm, B. C. -buildings , dark blue lake in background.)
(Salmon Arm, B. C. - 4 lane divided st. curves into downtown.)
(Salmon Arm, B. C. – Downtown buildings, 4 lane divided st.)
(Salmon Arm, B. C. - Downtown buildings, 4 lane divided st.)

(Salmon Arm, B. C. buildings by highway, snowy mtn. in background.)
(Salmon Arm, B. C. buildings by highway, snowy mtn. in background.)
(Salmon Arm, B. C. buildings by highway, snowy mtn. in background.)
(Salmon Arm, B. C. buildings by highway.)
(Salmon Arm, B. C. buildings by highway, snowy mtn. in background.)
(Salmon Arm, B. C. – Snow covered field by highway, snowy mtn. in background.)
(Salmon Arm, B. C. – Snow covered field and buildings by highway, snowy mtn. in background.)
(Salmon Arm, B. C. Highway enters Salmon Arm.)
(Salmon Arm, B. C. Highway enters Salmon Arm.)
(Salmon Arm, B. C. Highway enters Salmon Arm.)
LEAVING SALMON ARM
(Salmon Arm, B. C. – B and B  buildings by highway.)
(Tappen, B. C. Canada - saw mill yard, piles of lumber.)
REMNANTS OF A ONCE THRIVING SAW MILL

(Tappen, B. C. Canada - sawmill near side of highway.)
TAPPEN
(Tappen, B. C. Canada - auto wreckers.)
TAPPEN SALVAGE AND LOG HOME
(Tappen, B. C. Canada – Gas station near side of highway.)
(Tappen, B. C. Canada - Downhill, to <br>
Tappen, between trees, Mtns. in the background.)
(Tappen, B. C. Canada – old cars under snow near side of highway.)
WHITE POST AUTO MUSEUM
(Tappen Valley, B. C. Canada – Highway going into valley.)
TAPPEN VALLEY
(Sorrento, B. C. Canada - Shuswap Lake Estates Golf and Country Club decorative retaining wall sign.)
(Sorrento, B. C. Canada - Shuswap Lake Estates, golf club house.)

(Sorrento, B. C. Canada - Signs near side of highway, overlooking lake.)
(Sorrento, B. C. Canada – sign near side of highway.)
(Sorrento, B. C. Canada – Clear sky, Mtns. highway.)
DOWN HILL TO SORRENTO

Now, Sorrento would be the place to live.

Warm lake in the summer, snow in the winter, green in the spring (actually, green all year) and red in the fall.

I almost got a job there, a few years ago, selling real estate, but the wife (W4) wouldn't move out of the big (shitty) city.

(Sorrento, B. C. Canada - Buildings near side of highway.)
(Sorrento, B. C. Buildings by highway, Sorrento.)
(Sorrento, B. C. Buildings by highway, Sorrento.)
(Sorrento, B. C. Buildings by highway, Sorrento.)
(Sorrento, B. C. Buildings by highway, Sorrento.)
(Sorrento, B. C. Buildings by highway, Sorrento.)
(Sorrento, B. C. Buildings by highway, Sorrento.)
(Sorrento, B. C. Buildings by highway, Sorrento.)

(Shuswap Lake, B. C. Canada – Dark blue water, Mtns. in the background.)
SHUSWAP LAKE
(Shuswap Lake, B. C. Canada – Dark blue water, Mtns. in the background.)
( Shuswap Lake, B. C. Canada - Dark blue water, Highway curves along the side of Shuswap lake, steep cliff face on other side.)
( Shuswap Lake, B. C. Canada - Dark blue water, Highway curves along the side of Shuswap lake, steep cliff face on other side.)
(Shuswap Lake, B. C. Canada - Dark blue water, Mtns. in the background.)
(Shuswap Lake, B. C. Canada - Dark blue water, Mtns. in the background.)
(Shuswap Lake, B. C. Canada – Dark blue water, Mtns. in the background.)
(Shuswap Lake, B. C. Canada – Dark blue water, Mtns. in the background.)
(Shuswap Lake, B. C. Canada – Sign and buildings in the snow, beside road, Dark blue water, Mtns. in the background.)
BOATWORLD - THIS SIGN IS SO BRIGHT AT NIGHT
(Shuswap Lake, B. C. Canada – Sign and buildings in the snow, beside road, Dark blue water, Mtns. in the background.)
I WOULD BE SURPRISED IF IT HAS NEVER CAUSED AN ACCIDENT
(Shuswap Lake, B. C. Canada – Eagle’s nest on top of a pole, beside road, Dark blue water, Mtns. in the background.)
LAKESIDE, VIEW, PROPERTY - PRICELESS
(Shuswap Lake, B. C. Canada – Highway bridge, beside road, Dark blue water, Mtns. in the background.)
TURN OFF AND OVERPASS TO ADAMS LAKE

These next pictures were taken in 2010 and added to this page in 2011,

Adams Lake can't be seen from Hwy. 1.

You have to cross a bridge and go North a few miles.

Just North of where I was standing is a large sawmill - ADAMS LAKE LUMBER

And a bit further North is a government camp site.

It is a good road but watch for logging tucks.

(Adams lake, B. C. - Shed & pipes, on the lake shore.)
ADAMS LAKE

(Adams lake, B. C. - Work boats at a dock.)
(Adams lake, B. C. - Large sawmill by the shore.)
(Adams lake, B. C. - Looking across lake, houses along shore at base of mountain.)
EAST SHORE - SOUTH OF WOOLFORD PT.
(Adams lake, B. C. - Looking across lake, houses along shore at base of mountain.)
(Adams lake, B. C. - Looking across lake, houses along shore at base of mountain.)
(Adams lake, B. C. - Looking across lake, houses along shore at base of mountain.)
(Adams lake, B. C. - Looking across lake, houses along shore at base of mountain.)
(Silvery Beach, B.C. Canada - Campsites and trees in snow.)
SILVERY BEACH RESORT

When I was little we camped at Silvery Beach.

In the middle of the night we could hear the steam engines hooking on to the through freight, to help it climb Mt. Chase.

(Silvery Beach, B.C. Canada - Campsites and trees amongst snow.)
(Silvery Beach, B.C. Canada - Campsites amongst trees.)
(Silvery Beach, B.C. Canada - Little Shuswap lake.)
LITTLE SHUSWAP LAKE
(Chase, B.C. Canada - Climbing the hill before the town of Chase.)
CLIMBING MT. CHASE
(Chase, B.C. Canada - Climbing the hill before the town of Chase.)
(Chase, B.C. Canada - Looking down on the town of Chase.)
LOOKING DOWN FROM MT. CHASE
(Chase, B.C. Canada - Looking down on the town of Chase.)
CHASE
(Chase, B.C. Canada -Looking down on the town of Chase.)
(Chase, B.C. Canada -Looking down on the town of Chase.)
(Chase, B.C. Canada -Looking down on the town of Chase.)
(Chase, B.C. Canada -  highway goes up a hill.)
(Chase, B.C. Canada - Motel.)
CHASE COUNTRY INN MOTEL
(Chase, B.C. Canada -  highway goes up a hill.)
(Chase, B.C. Canada -  highway goes up a hill.)
(Chase, B.C. Canada -(Looking down on the town of Chase.)
(Chase, B.C. Canada - highway goes up a hill.)
(Chase, B.C. Canada - highway goes up a hill.)
(Chase, B.C. Canada - highway beside river, ice on river, snow on hills, cloudy sky.)
SOUTH THOMPSON RIVER
(Chase, B.C. Canada - highway beside river, ice on river, snow on hills, cloudy sky.)
(Chase, B.C. Canada - highway beside river, ice on river, snow on hills, cloudy sky.)
(Chase, B.C. Canada - highway beside river, ice on river, snow on hills, cloudy sky.)
(Pritchard, B.C. Canada - highway beside river, ice on river, snow on hills, cloudy sky, pick up on train tracks.)
PRITCHARD STATION
(Pritchard, B.C. Canada - Highway approaching a cluster of buildings, Pritchard.)
( Pritchard, B.C. Canada - Closer to the buildings, Pritchard.)
(Pritchard, B.C. Canada - Highway beside the train tracks, Thompson river on the other side, Pritchard bridge in the distance, mountains in the background.)
SOUTH THOMPSON RIVER - PRITCHARD BRIDGE
( Pritchard, B.C. Canada - Highway beside the train tracks, Thompson river on the other side, Pritchard homes along the river, beneath the cut banks.)
( Pritchard, B.C. Canada - South Thompson River by highway.)
 Pritchard, B.C. Canada - Ging Seng, a field of black.)
BLACK PLASTIC PROTECTS A FIELD OF GING SENG

The day was sunny, but it was hard to get this picture along Highway 1.

I was trying to get the dust that was blowing across the road. There were times when I couldn't see the pavement in front of me.

Reminds me very much of Lethbridge, Alberta.

And people wonder why I would never live in Kamloops.

I did actually, for 2 weeks. Wind and dust. I had enough of that when, as a youngster, I lived on the prairies.

(Kamloops, B.C. Canada - Misc. old equipment for sale beside highway.)
(Kamloops, B.C. Canada - Fields being irrigated beside highway.)
(Kamloops, B.C. Canada - Highway beside the train tracks, cut banks in the background.)
(Kamloops, B.C. Canada - Highway goes under an Monte Lake overpass.)
OVERPASS - HWY. 97 GOES SOUTH TO MONTE LAKE
(Kamloops, B.C. Canada - Highway beside the train tracks, Thompson river on the other side, mountains in the background, much dust.)
DUST SWIRLS BLOCK THE VIEW OF THE HOO DOOS
(Kamloops,  B. C. Canada -  Thompson river beside highway.)
(Kamloops,  B. C. Canada -  long train of car cars, beside highway.)
(Kamloops, B.C. Canada – Train tracks and river beside highway, homes on the other side of hwy.)
APPROACHING KAMLOOPS
(Kamloops,  B. C. Canada -  fields and houses.)
(Kamloops, B.C. Canada - Train tracks and river beside highway, homes on the other side of river.)
(Kamloops,  B. C. Canada -  fields and houses.)
(Kamloops, B.C. Canada - Train tracks and river beside highway, homes on the other side of river.)
(Kamloops,  B. C. Canada -  highway enters a suburbs.)
(Kamloops,  B. C. Canada - buildings by highway, cut banks in background.)
(Kamloops, B.C. Canada – Tracks and highway go between buildings, snow speckled Mtns. And large plume of smoke in distance.)
(Kamloops,  B. C. Canada -  past buildings.)
(Kamloops,  B. C. Canada -  down hill, past buildings.)
(Kamloops, B.C. Canada – tracks, river, bridge plume of smoke Mtns..)
THE BRIDGE IS HWY. 5 NORTH TO JASPER - THE PLUME
IS STEAM FROM THE PULP MILL WEST OF KAMLOOPS
(Kamloops,  B. C. Canada -  highway 5 exits to the left.)
HWY. 5 EXITS TO THE RIGHT, TO GO TO JASPER
(Kamloops, B.C. Canada - Looking down on the city of Kamloops.)
(Kamloops, B.C. Canada – hoodoos beside hwy..)
(Kamloops, B.C. Canada – Homes atop hoodoos.)
(Kamloops, B.C. Canada - (Looking down on the city of Kamloops.)
(Kamloops, B.C. Canada - (Looking down on the city of Kamloops.)
(Kamloops, B.C. Canada – Homes atop hoodoos.)
(Kamloops, B.C. Canada – Buildings, industrial area, in background  plume of smoke Mtns..)
(Kamloops, B.C. Canada - Down hill into Kamloops,  B. C. Canada -  past buildings.)
(Kamloops, B.C. Canada - Kamloops,  B. C. Canada -  sun sets over the hills.)
BELOW - THE THOMPSON RIVER

(Kamloops, B.C. Canada - Freeway, turn off to freeway.)
APPROACHING HWY. 1, FROM HWY. 5
(Kamloops, B.C. Canada -  highway scale buildings, both sides)
HWY. 1 WEST, & EAST, BOUND SCALES
(Kamloops, B.C. Canada - Trans Canada Highway, house on a barren hill.)
HWY. 1 - JUST WEST OF THE JUNCTION WITH HWY. 5
(Kamloops, B.C. Canada - Trans Canada Highway dips to go around a barren knob.)
(Kamloops, B.C. Canada - Trans Canada Highway, lake, barren mountains in the background.)
KAMLOOPS LAKE
(Savona, B. C., Trans Canada Highway, a peninsula juts out into lake, barren mountains in the background.)
THE END OF THOMPSON LAKE
THE LITTLE PENINSULA IS THE TOWN OF SAVONA
(Savona, B. C. Lumber piles.)
WORLD'S LARGEST SAWMILL
(Savona, B. C. Restaurant and store.)
SAVONA
(Savona, B. C. Field, of rusting metal.)
WORLD'S LARGEST SCRAP YARD
MOSTLY OLD EQUIPMENT FROM A NEARBY MINE
(Savona, B. C. bridge over river, railways and mountains in the background.)
THE THOMPSON RIVER SEPARATES
THE WORLD'S TWO LONGEST RAILWAYS

This entire area, from Savona to Cache Creek, was, once, the world's largest orchard.

The heart of the operation was a town called Walhachin ( Land of the Round Rock ).

The black line that can be seen in many places, along the hillsides, and cliffs, is the remains of boards that once formed a flume to carry water for irrigation (The ghosts of Walhachin).

From the flume to the river, the hillsides were covered with apple trees.

When the second World War started, so many men enlisted in the army, there was not enough workers left to maintain the orchards.

(Walhachin , B. C. Canada - Trans Canada Highway, freshly irrigated fields near the river, barren mountains in the background.)
(Walhachin , B. C. Canada - Trans Canada Highway,  a freshly painted farm against barren mountains in the background.)
(Walhachin , B. C. Canada - Trans Canada Highway, ranch on green hillside.)
SOUTH SIDE OF HIGHWAY 1
FRESHLY IRRIGATED
(Walhachin , B. C. Canada - Trans Canada Highway, ranch on dry hillside.)
NORTH SIDE OF HIGHWAY 1
THIRSTY FIELDS

(Walhachin , B. C. Canada - Trans Canada Highway, a dark line across the hillside.)
IRRIGATION IN 1912 - A FLUME (AN OPEN WOODEN PIPE)
A STRAIGHT LINE ALONG THE HILLS AND CLIFFS
(Walhachin , B. C. Canada - Trans Canada Highway, wheels and pipes in contrast.)
PART OF A MODERN IRRIGATION SYSTEM
SILHOUETTED BY THE SETTING SUN

(Cache Creek, B. C. black plastic covers field of ging seng near highway.)
BLACK PLASTIC PROTECTS A CROP OF GING SENG FROM
THE HOT SUN - THIS REGION HAS BECOME FAMOUS
FOR ITS GING SENG - EVEN CHINESE PREFER IT TO THE
ONCE POPULAR KOREAN RED
(Cache Creek, B. C. green irrigated fields beside highway.)
JUST EAST OF CACHE CREEK

CACHE CREEK

(Cache Creek, B. C., highway junction.)
LOOKING NORTH TO JUNCTION OF HIGHWAYS 1 AND 97
(Cache Creek, B. C. highway junction.)
LOOKING SOUTH TO JUNCTION OF HIGHWAYS 1 AND 97
(Cache Creek, B. C. small plaza of stores.)
(Cache Creek, B. C., Bill Ma Restaurant.)

END

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